Woosung Street, Hong Kong .

Woosung Street, Hong Kong.

Hong Kong really is an interesting place, particularly you’ve never been there before. Just wondering the streets can be an overload for the senses with all the sights and sounds that greet you. This is one of t he images I took while exploring Woosung Street which was close to where we were staying, however, it only recently occurred to me that I have no idea what these signs say. Until now I’d simply like the photo for all the different textures, colours and shapes that it contained. However, now I’m wondering what the signs say. I’m wondering if someone can help me out?


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Glenorchy Morning Light

Glenorchy Morning Light

It recently occurred to me that I have no idea what the name of this mountain range is. I’m sure I found out at the time I took this picture however for now, the name escapes me. I took this on an early morning stroll around the Glenorchy village when most normal people are asleep. The sun was creeping up between the mountains and it must have struck a gap in the clouds because this spectacular band of light lit up across the mountains above the lake.


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Belfast & The Titanic

Titanic Belfast

Venturing through a new city while it is raining is a very frustrating exercise due to the fact that knowing where you are requires you to observe your surroundings. This is something that is very difficult to do if you’re trying to duck and weave around rain drops at the same time. This was just the case when I arrived at the former Harland & Wolf shipyard, otherwise known as the Titanic Quarter in Belfast. 

Upon arrival, shaking the rain off like a wet dog and noticing the rather large puddle of water I had created, I was suddenly startled with a cheerful ‘good morning.’ Having moved through the entrance way, I was now aware of the sizable water obstacle I had made right in the doorway of Belfast’s popular ‘Titanic Experience.’ Replying to the ‘good morning’ with a sheepish ‘sorry’ I moved towards the direction of the ticket booths. It was at this point that it struck me how appropriate it seemed to be drenched in rain, visiting a museum about a ship that sunk. It also struck me how empty the place was, this was partially by design and partially by hope.

With my ticket in hand and the clock sitting just before 10am, I made my way through the near deserted foyer. The plan had been to arrive early and thus avoid long lines and lots of slow moving crowds. Adding to this plan was the fact that the school holidays had finished and people had returned to work after the December/January festive season. Pleased with the success of this planning and having paid the entry fee while watching people avoid the water jump I had created, I headed for the escalator with a head full of Titanic excitement. 

I have to admit I fall into the group of people who find the Titanic fascinating. I also have to admit that I agree with James Cameron. I agree that the Titanic is a love story. I’m not sure it’s the epic, romantic disaster tale that James Cameron showed us in 1997, but it is a love story nonetheless. My visit to Belfast showed me that it’s not a romantic story between two people, it’s much more complicated than that. It’s a story of a love affair, about hopes and dreams, death and survival, of passion, of lust, of beauty, greed, wealth, vision and a promise of a golden age yet to come. It’s a tale of love between a ship, the city it was built in, the people that built her and the families that watched it grow into the sky at the Harland & Wolf shipyard. It’s a Belfast love story.

* * *

Speaking of the Titanic, let’s talk about acts of heroism. Let’s talk about John Jacob Astor IV. In the early hours of April 15th, 1912, just after 1:55am on a clear, star light night Astor stood smoking a cigarette. Having just kissed his darling wife and helped her into lifeboat Number 4,  he watched the lifeboat get lowered into the water, having given his own place to two scared and frightened children. You can only imagine what would have been going through his mind as he watched the boat lower without him. Seven days later Astor’s body was found and identified by the initials sewn on the label of his jacket. Found on him was a gold pocket watch which his son Vincent wore for the rest of his life. Some time later, while his wife and unborn child sat in a lifeboat, a survivor claimed to have seen Astor in the water clinging to a raft with supposedly frozen feet. At some point the coldness forced him to release his hold. 


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Fairlie-Tekapo Road

State Highway 8, Burkes Pass, 2021

I wanted to create an image where the eye moved across it in one single and deliberate direction. My first thought was of the fence line and the different wires and textures that ran across the scene. The closer I looked the more I noticed how they seemed to break the foreground up into tiny sections, each with their own unique characteristic.

From there I wanted the eye to slowly move up the image having to refocus and adjust on what was there until they reached the top. It’s an image where I wanted to encourage the viewer to have a long stare and ask their own questions about the different textures and shape formations they could see.

The Experience Of Seeing
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Three Creeks

Three Creeks, Burkes Pass, 2021

I saw all these selves and displays lined with antique car and sign memorabilia. They had been quite deliberately organised and setout. So when I looked at what was on display my eye travelled along the shelf, focusing on different objects and thinking how all the items were related. So, I wanted to take a photo that what’s just like what I was seeing.

The Experience Of Seeing
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Black & Brew

Black and Brew, Dunedin, 2021

Morning – Coffee – Takeaway Cup – Park – Steam – Fog – Window – Order – Chat – Window – Cactus – Green – Lettering – Black Lettering – Cactus Angle – Window Frame Angle – Lettering – Contrast – Steam – Visibility – No Visibility – Coffee Ready – Shoot – Chat – Collect – Go.

The Experience Of Seeing
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Kitchener Street

Kitchener Street, Dunedin, 2021

The other day I showed this image to someone and they thought I’d lost my mind. I think their words were something like ‘that’s one of the worst photos I’ve seen you take!’

I then explained that it’s a photo about thinking. During the Level 4 Lockdown I would go out walking in the afternoons, generally in the same place but sometimes my routes would vary. On these walks one thing I noticed was the lack of rubbish and it really stuck with me how much cleaner the world seemed. When we moved down to Level 3, I continued my walks when one day I came across a recently discarded McDonalds Cup lying in the grass. I realised how long it had been since I’d seen litter and how ironic it seemed that it was from a recently opened fast food outlet. 

As I wanted to create a photo that reflected my thinking and asked the questions I had, the only way I could do this was to create a photo that reflected these thoughts and questions.

The Experience Of Seeing
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