COVID-19

Coronavirus Information

I recently had what for me is a unique and rare situation. I experienced Wellington on a good day. I’m not for one moment suggesting that Wellington doesn’t have good days, more reflecting on the fact that most of my trips to the capital city have included wind, rain, strong wind or a blended mix of all three with scattered fine spells randomly thrown in. On this particular visit to Wellington, not only was the weather still and clear, but the temperature – according to the metservice – sat at a comfortable 21+ degrees late into the evening. A splendid autumn day all round. 

To make the most of this lovely day, I headed out around Wellington on foot. Feeling slightly overdressed and cursing my choice of clothing, I head out the door to find the waterfront via a breakfast stop. Once having partaken of a bacon buttie at a very trendy place called ‘The Hanger’ on Dixon Street and feeling freshly loaded with caffeine and bacon, I departed out into the sun for the waterfront. 

Walking through the sun drenched streets that zigzag their way between Courtney Place, Cuba and Wakefield Street I turned on to Victoria Street heading for Queens Wharf. At one point, Victoria Street as it is known today didn’t exist. It was once open land that contained a scattering of timber cottages before numerous redevelopment programmes over 150 years has developed it into a busy shopping street that now contains high-end clothes shops, jewellers, cafe and bars, hotels and the central police station. It was when passing the Wellington Central Police Station that a printed A3 sign sellotaped to the window caught my eye. The sign read;
“Should you be in self-isolation? If so, please do not come in.” It then directed readers to call a healthline for information on Coronavirus and provided very helpful advice to visit a website or call 105 for police matters. 

What a truly uniquely (yet typical) kiwi response I thought chuckling to myself while taking in the details of the guidance provided. Before entering do you call the healthline to see if you should indeed be in self-isolation before proceeding with your decision to refrain or enter? Do they assume people automatically know this information? What happens if after arriving at the doors and deciding that yes you should be in isolation, do you self-isolate before calling 105 or call 105 right there and then. Further to this dilemma, what happens if your battery is flat, the internet goes down or you run out of credit? When do you risk entering and do you have to bring your own toilet paper and hand sanitizer? 

As I continued on my way, the sign stayed in my thoughts. Is this the moment when New Zealand’s laid-back, pragmatic and she’ll be right outlook and attitude could be New Zealand’s downfall? Clearly this world wide pandemic is a major problem and it’s spreading. 

I’m not suggesting for one moment that the New Zealand Police or Government aren’t doing enough to stop the spread of this pandemic, far from it but well placed signage is obviously a key strategy we are using to keep people informed so they can make enlightened decisions. 

Based on what we know so far, we are clearly going to need more advisory signage displayed, particularly at our custom checkpoints. I would like to suggest they read: “It would be better for all concerned if you stayed at home. But the choice is yours.”

Continue reading COVID-19
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Te Aho a Māui

Let The Beginning Connect Us

Mist can be such a cool effect, especially if you’re lucky enough to find it hanging around in a city. This is the Wellington waterfront one morning as low thick mist covered almost everything until the day warmed up. I found this sculpture by Rewi Thompson  that was partially covered in the mist and it had this cool stone, tile effect surrounding it.

Let the beginning connect us – Buy

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Truly Unique Wellington

Solace of the Wind

I love this sculpture by artist Max Patte. I visit it every time I go to Wellington but I always seem to catch it in the morning. I’ll have to make a return trip one day to catch it with the evening light behind it. I did a bit of research about it the first time I saw it and it turns out that it was originally loaned to the city for a year in the hopes of finding a patron but has been there ever since (that’s ten years now!).

Solace of the Wind – Buy


Competition – Give Away

I decided it’s time to give away some art. I’ve got this lovely 18 x 12 inch print of Dunedin’s historical home, Olveston to give away.  It’s mounted, framed, finished with glass  and has a value of $400. The great thing is that it’s all ready to be hung and an enjoyed in your home, office, flat, or wherever you desire.
Printing by the The Photo Gallery in Dunedin.
Mounting and framing by Gallery De Novo in Dunedin. Continue reading Truly Unique Wellington

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In Love With Colin McCahon

Am I Scared Boy (eh).

There’s a reason Colin McCahon is widely regarded as New Zealand’s most important modern artist and if you get a chance to view his work, it doesn’t take long to understand why. I had the chance to see an exhibition of his work in Wellington which had me (and many others) spellbound. I only hope I get to see another exhibition of his.Am I Scared Boy (eh) – Buy


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Blue Rain by Alistair Te Ariki Campbell

Blue Rain

A bit of poetry from Alistair Te Ariki Campbell for Friday.

Blue Rain
Blue rain from a clear sky.
Our world a cube of sunlight —
but to the south
the violet admonition
of thunder.

Innocent as flowers
your eyes with their thick lashes
open in green surprise.

What have we to fear?
Frost and a sharp wind
reproach us,
and a tall sky pelts the roof
with blue flowers.

You and I in bed, my love,
heads leaning together,
merry as thieves
eating stolen honey —
what have we to fear
but a borrowed world
collapsing all about us
in blue ruins?

By Alistair Te Ariki Campbell


Blue sky – Buy


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